Definition of Coaching, Definition of Mentoring

Definition of coaching provided by Leadership Connections, experts in coaching for individuals and organisations. Read our free definition of coaching, which explains the meaning of coaching, what coaching includes and what coaching looks like.

What is coaching?

Like any new management term, the meaning of Coaching has become less clear as more and more people adopt it and use it, sometimes loosely, to describe different things.

Scroll down or click here to read a simple summary of the meaning of coaching, what it includes and what it looks like.

If you feel we could help you in any way, please Contact Us.

Supporting leaders to overcome their obstacles and develop themselves - through coaching and mentoring

Increasing the effectiveness of management teams through leadership team development

Identifying and improving leadership across the organisation through talent management and leadership development

Mobilising large groups for change through creating inspiring conferences and motivational speaking

Increasing the effectiveness of the Human Resources function through HR strategy and skills development

 

Coaching Guide - How to choose and use coaching

What is Coaching?

The gurus

Timothy Gallwey in his series of books on “The Inner Game” is very clear: “Inner Game coaching is unlocking a person’s potential to maximise their own performance; helping them to learn rather than teaching them”. And Sir John Whitmore in “Coaching for Performance”, probably the best single book available about coaching, says that “building awareness, responsibility and self-belief is the goal of a coach”.

Our definitions

We in Leadership Connections endorse these thoughts. Unfortunately, agreement among practicing coaches, and particularly coaching organisations, is less than complete. So we have laid out here some expanded thoughts which will give more depth and colour to our coaching beliefs and practice.

We define coaching at four levels;

What does it look like?

At it’s simplest, coaching is a one-to-one relationship in which the coach supports the coachee to identify, focus on, and achieve what is important to them. The principles of coaching can also be extended to the development of teams, to a leadership style and even as a way to change the culture of an organisation.

In a 1:1 setting, through a series of conversations, the coach helps the coachee to explore their personal and career vision and goals, their current situation and the changes they want to make, the actions they want to take to make the changes and their experience and learning from those actions.

In tackling these areas the coach will also help the coachees to be; more aware of him / herself and their impact on others, willing to take responsibility for and able to respond to the situation, able to learn from their experience and more self motivated.

Whilst there are a number of applications of coaching, one thing that is vital for any good coach or successful coaching programme is confidentiality. For it to work effectively, individuals must be able to speak freely and trust that anything they say will be treated with absolute confidence. Any good coach will make this very clear in the initial contracting.

When is it useful?

Coaching is most useful for individuals when they are: formulating a business, career or personal strategy, in transition from one role to another, building a new skill or resolving a dilemma.

Coaching can also help individuals to transform their personal performance, help new teams to reach peak performance quickly or help established teams to improve their effectiveness, or shape a cultural shift in organisations seeking to move to more responsive, committed, flexible, open ways of working.

Coaching works best when the client/s wants to be coached rather than when they think they need to be coached or, worse, when someone else tells them they have to.

Some common misconceptions

Coaches solve their coachees’ problems for them - They apply their coaching expertise and attend to the coaching process while coachees address the content of their issues.

Coaching is a “soft option”. - True coaching will challenge your perceptions of your role and behaviour and hold you to account on delivering the actions you commit to.

Coaching is a way to ‘fix’ people - Our experience is that those who benefit most from a coaching relationship are those who want to make some changes in the way they operate. This can be good performers who have the potential to be great as well as people with challenges who wish to resolve them. Individuals who are ‘subjected to’ coaching for remedial purposes are much more difficult to help, and if they are resistant, then progress may not be made at all.

Coaching is a substitute for good management. - Good coaches work in partnership with line managers and encourage the development of their coaching capabilities.

Let's Talk

The easiest way to understand how we can help, and whether you feel that you could work with us, is to begin with a conversation.

We don't believe in a "hard sell" and often find that people get value out of the exploratory discussion - whether or not we go on to work together.

Please Contact Us – we would love to hear from you.

 

Definition of Coaching, Definition of Mentoring

Definition of coaching provided by Leadership Connections, experts in coaching for individuals and organisations. Read our free definition of coaching, which explains the meaning of coaching, what coaching includes and what coaching looks like.